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  • Reflections on The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: Storage

    I’ve been reading the best-seller The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, and implementing the “KonMari Method” described. It’s so fascinating that I’m turning my thoughts about it into a series of posts. Note: This post contains affiliate links that help support this site at no additional cost to you. Thank you for clicking through them! You can read CFO’s full disclosure here.

    Reflections on the Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up | Chief Family Officer

    There are a couple of things about the KonMari method of storage that I’m finding work incredibly well – so well that I can’t understand why I never thought of doing them before.

    One is store things vertically so you can see everything. For example, I had a banker’s box in which I kept our extra oral care supplies – toothbrushes, toothpaste, floss, etc. Everything just got tossed into the box, and it worked okay, in that we always knew where to find a new toothbrush or tube of toothpaste, and I always knew where to put new items when I brought them home from the store. But in tidying the box, I found myself discarding lots of samples and old kids’ toothbrushes that are too small for the kids now. And I wanted to be able to really see what’s in there at a glance. I hit upon the idea of storing everything standing up in zip-top plastic bags, like so:

    tidied oral care box | chieffamilyofficer.com

    We had a similar arrangement with razors and Q-tips, which I kept in a different banker’s box. Everything was a jumble, but I was able to use more zip-top bags to group the men’s razors, the disposable razors, and the women’s razors together:

    tidied razor box | chieffamilyofficer.com

    Which brings me to another wonderful aspect of the KonMari method of storage: keep like things together. For example, I had jewelry in two different locations. I tended to only look in one location, so when I sorted through my jewelry, I realized I had many pieces I hadn’t worn in a long time simply because I’d forgotten all about them. I kept only those pieces that sparked joy, and then rearranged my storage so that everything is in one spot, and easy to see from above. And now every time I go to get my wedding ring, I put on another piece of jewelry (or two or more) that make me happy.