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  • Cards And Character: Bingo gaming etiquette

    This is a guest post.

    Win a prize, win some friends too

    No matter where you are in the world, you have to adhere to different social etiquettes as a way of respecting other people’s rights. For instance, The New York Times said in one article that forming a line is one of the few overlooked ways to be polite to the people who were on that particular place before you. Meanwhile, being on time especially during professional meetings is a universally accepted standard which should never be broken. While etiquette varies from one place to another, it is much trickier to act in accord to melting pots — such as bingo halls, for instance. So in case you want to go out with your Cheekybingo buddies to a live bingo game, here are some social tips you should keep in mind:

    Keep your voice down. This is the first rule of bingo etiquette. Although bingo is a social game and you will eventually find a friend or two after a few rounds, one thing you must always remember is to keep your voice to a minimal level — even the most seasoned veterans of the game hush down before the game begins. Piping down during the game allows you to hear the numbers — and avoid enemies on the floor, as well.

    Avoid parroting the numbers. Before the age of high-definition displays and LCD projectors, other players would repeat the numbers yelled by the announcer for those who missed the call. Unfortunately, this act is no longer irrelevant since bingo halls are now equipped with projectors so even the players at the far end of the room can see what’s just been drawn. Parroting the numbers is not just distracting, but it is also downright annoying.

    When in doubt, don’t shout. Before you inhale a lungful of air and scream “bingo” at the top of your lungs, make sure that you just hit the jackpot. Remember, people will look daggers at you once they realize that you haven’t really won.

    Share a seat, win a friend. While you often see this notice at restaurants, this also holds merit at bingo halls. Sharing a seat will not just make you win friends, but will also prove that you have good values. Incidentally, don’t hesitate to give up your chair once a player asks for his or her “lucky seat.”

    Consideration was received for the publication of this post.

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