Don't miss out! Get Chief Family Officer's free daily roundup:


WHAT'S HOT RIGHT NOW:

  • Enter to win one of two $25 Target Bean Bag gift cards!
  • Rent over 20,000 videos for $1.99 or less at Amazon.


  • FDA Advisory: Nonprescription Cough and Cold Medicine Use in Children

    A few days ago, the FDA issued a Public Health Advisory on Nonprescription Cough and Cold Medicine Use in Children. It’s nothing new, but it’s worth repeating – especially since summer colds are going around (in fact, poor Tyler’s got one):

    • Do not use cough and cold products in children under 2 years of age UNLESS given specific directions to do so by a healthcare provider.
    • Do not give children medicine that is packaged and made for adults. Use only products marked for use in babies, infants or children (sometimes called “pediatric” use).
    • Cough and cold medicines come in many different strengths. If you are unsure about the right product for your child, ask a healthcare provider.
    • If other medicines (over-the-counter or prescription) are being given to a child, the child’s healthcare provider should review and approve their combined use.
    • Read all of the information in the “Drug Facts” box on the package label so that you know the active ingredients and the warnings.
    • Follow the directions in the “Drug Facts” box. Do not give a child medicine more often or in greater amounts than is stated on the package.
    • Too much medicine may lead to serious and life-threatening side effects, particularly in children aged 2 years and younger.
    • For liquid products, parents should use the measuring device (dropper, dosing cup or dosing spoon) that is packaged with each different medicine formulation and that is marked to deliver the recommended dose. A kitchen teaspoon or tablespoon is not an appropriate measuring device for giving medicines to children.
    • If a measuring device is not included with the product, parents should purchase one at the pharmacy. Make sure that the dropper, dosing cup or dosing spoon has markings on it that match the dosing that is in the directions in the “Drug Facts” box on the package label, or is recommended by the child’s health care provider.
    • If you DO NOT UNDERSTAND the instructions on the product, or how to use the dosing device (dropper, dosing cup or dosing spoon), DO NOT USE the medicine. Consult your healthcare provider if you have questions or are confused.
    • Cough and cold medicines only treat the symptoms of the common cold such as runny nose, congestion, fever, aches, and irritability. They do not cure the common cold. Children get better with time.
    • If a child’s condition worsens or does not improve, stop using the product and immediately take the child to a health care provider for evaluation.

    Via About.com: Parenting.

    class="nolinks"